Gun-rights advocates protest new law in Olympia, WA

Now, this is what we like to see! A peaceful gathering of people to stand up for their rights. It is not a surprise that more of the MSM did not report this event. We only found out about it the day after!

This event goes to show that the thousands of people they are trying to regulate are peaceful, law-abiding citizens. They do not need regulation.

OLYMPIA— About 1,000 gun-rights advocates, many openly carrying rifles and handguns, rallied Saturday outside the Capitol to protest a new expanded gun background check law in Washington state.

Organizers of the “I Will Not Comply” rally promised to exchange and sell firearms without conducting background checks during the daylong rally in opposition to the state’s voter-approved universal background check law.

“We’re going to stand up for our rights,” rally organizer Gavin Seim said. “Our rights are not up for negotiation.”

Initiative 594 passed with 59 percent of the vote last month. Geoff Potter, who served as a spokesman for the pro-initiative campaign, said that the rally was “a very loud, but very, very narrow and unrepresentative view of what the people of Washington have clearly demonstrated they want on background checks and gun laws.”

At an I-594 “violation station” people posed with rifles that weren’t theirs, and a wedding party unaffiliated with the protest that was taking pictures on the Capitol steps got into the spirit.

Rally participant Brandon Lyons of Spanaway handed his AR-10 rifle to the groom, who posed with the rifle and his bride, then the best man held the firearm and mugged with the couple. The bride and groom, who were to be married later in Tacoma, wouldn’t give their full names.

“We’ve all just broken the law,” Lyons said after they took pictures with the rifle.

However, Washington State Patrol Trooper Guy Gill said “we’re not convinced that handing someone a gun is a violation of 594.”

The law, which took effect Dec. 4, requires background checks on all sales and transfers, including private transactions and many loans and gifts.

Opponents have taken most issue with the language surrounding transfers. I-594 defines a transfer as the delivery of a firearm “without consideration of payment or promise of payment including, but not limited to, gifts and loans.” Exceptions include emergency gun transfers concerning personal safety, gifts between family members, antiques and loans for hunting.

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